6 Star Leaders

Unlocking Business Potential: 8 Critical Success Factors with Daryl Urbanski

June 13, 2023 Aveline Clarke Season 3 Episode 21
6 Star Leaders
Unlocking Business Potential: 8 Critical Success Factors with Daryl Urbanski
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Are you ready to take your business to new heights? Join us as we talk with Canadian entrepreneur and business coach Daryl Urbanski on his mission to help create 200 new multi-million dollar businesses. Listen and learn from Daryl's unique perspective on what it takes to succeed in today's ever-changing business landscape, as well as the importance of personal traits and leadership skills in achieving success.

Throughout the conversation, we discuss the eight critical success factors necessary for business success, diving into each factor in greater detail. We share incredible stories of businesses that failed due to not taking these factors into account, emphasizing the importance of self-awareness and introspection in paving the way to success.

This episode is packed with practical wisdom and actionable advice that will leave you feeling empowered to take your business to the next level.

Enjoy!


Here's some information about our guest:

Daryl Urbanski
FOUNDER | PRESIDENT OF BESTBUSINESSCOACH.CA
HOST OF THE BEST BUSINESS PODCAST

Daryl Urbanski is best known for his ability to create seven-figure, automated income streams from scratch.

First, as Senior Marketing Director for Neurogym. He helped generate over $1.6 Million USD in under 8 months with a single marketing strategy. This became $7.5 Million USD in 3 years. He continued this success with multiple clients. He's now set on a mission to help create 200 NEW multi-million dollar businesses. How? Science & Accountability.

After 400+ expert interviews & $50,000 in evidence-based research. He uncovered 8 critical business habits. These 8 critical habits will determine who survives & thrives in these unprecedented times and who succumbs.

Daryl has quickly climbed the entrepreneurial ladder, gaining respect from thousands of business owners worldwide.

An author to speaker, marketer to coach - Daryl's multi-faceted business approach sets him apart as one of the leading business experts of his generation.


Contact:

W: www.bestbusinesscoach.ca/
Podcast: The Best Business Podcast


The purpose of the 6 Star Leaders podcast is to showcase and illuminate purposeful Business Owners on their journey to creating more impact in the world. We are igniting purposeful leaders!
At our core, we believe in 'doing business differently' so that heart, purpose, and passion are combined with profits for the best possible outcome. With those key ingredients, you'll be on your way to 6 Stars faster than you realise!

If you'd like to get in touch please contact us at contact@6starleaders.com

Speaker 1:

like Fight Club. If you've never been in a fight, how can you know everything about yourself? So you gotta know yourself. You have to put yourself in different situations. You can do all sorts of personality tests right, but then it just. It really comes down to like trying to find your icky guy which is kind of your reason for living, what you would do even if money wasn't an issue, and then marry that with something the problem people are willing to pay to have to help with.

Speaker 2:

Hello, i'm your host, aveline Clark, and this is the Six Star Business Podcast, where we have conversations with amazing, incredible people, all about what it takes to be Six Star going beyond the status quo, doing things differently, and how they bring purpose, love and impact into their businesses every day. This is Darryl Ubanski, and I just love everything about this conversation. I love Darryl's energy, his experience, his knowledge, his practical wisdom and cutting through the BS right. He can speak to anybody the business owner, the business employee, the entrepreneur, everyday people and his cross-cultural experience gives him just this breadth of knowledge and understanding. I love everything he's doing, i love what he's talking about and there's so much for all of us in this. This is Darryl Ubanski. Enjoy, hello. Hello, here we are. I am your host, aveline. I'm here with my co-host today, korae Sebest, in Germany. How are you doing? Wonderful, always excited and happy to be back.

Speaker 3:

And looking forward to an amazing story by Darryl. So let's get off. Yes, welcome, welcome, darryl.

Speaker 2:

Thank, you for coming and joining us on Six Star Podcast. Thank you, it's an honor and a pleasure to be here.

Speaker 1:

I'm just here to serve and hopefully everyone tuning in gets some sort of helpful nugget that can help them along their journey. I have no doubt that is going to happen.

Speaker 2:

I can just tell. I can feel it in my bones, just like even the way that we jumped into the green room before we started recording. So let's get started. I've got a few questions for you, darryl, just to get to know you better. Could you let us know where are you in the world right now? I'm a Canadian, but these days I'm based out of the Philippines.

Speaker 1:

Lovely, and who do you serve?

Speaker 2:

How do you serve them? So I used to say I help businesses with websites get customers and keep them.

Speaker 1:

But everyone's got a website. Everyone's been pushed to understand they need a digital presence of some sort. So now I just say you know my mission is to help create 200 new multi-million dollar businesses. How proven methods, accountability and step-by-step system. So I'm really focused on some of the things that I've done in the past. So I'm really focused on supporting the small and medium-sized business owner, regardless of politics. It's undeniable that businesses were massacred. It's undeniable that governments and big corporations have taken a much, much, much larger piece of the pie for themselves. It's a fact that middle class is disappearing. So the world's turning into haves and have-nots And my daughter's name is Malaya, which into Galak means freedom, and I really think that the future is on the backs of us, the small and medium-sized business owners. So I'm here to support and serve us. I've been a business coach. I mean my high school co-op like you had to do two weeks somewhere was with a company called MarketMeca and BizBoundca, which were kind of like startup incubators, business coaching services And that was what I did when I was 17 in high school And obviously I went out and did different things, but that's like when it started. I was nominated Young Entrepreneur of the Year, my small town. I didn't win, but I was nominated for what that's worth. I've just been in this game a long time. I've been helping businesses for over 17 years in various capacities And at the beginning of the pandemic a lot of people were arguing about the science, the science of this, the science of that.

Speaker 1:

And I was an orphan. But I was raised by my adopted mom and my step-adopted dad and my step-adopted dad that man, he worked in applied physics and geology, which are hard sciences, and I had had something happen to me and I'm sorry maybe we're going out of order here, but I got triggered because I was just doing workshops, like on the side. I was traveling around in Vietnam. My daughter had just been born, we planned on having her. We had her living in Palawan in the Philippines. I kind of took her early retirement, made a bunch of people, a bunch of money, realized money wasn't making me happy, started looking for my life partner, no matter where on the planet they might be. I travel with my dog to a bunch of different countries. I helped some of my adopted family overcome some challenges, some substance abuse issues, and that I knew I wanted to have kids and that my family would be the soil that my kids grow out of the next generation. So I kind of spent six months and a few tens of thousands of dollars to help some relatives out. And then I kind of helped my adopted parents retire and just kind of took a mini retirement, went to the Philippines for a couple of years, figured out what else I wanted to do And I was working with clients on the side and whatever. It's been easy for me to just kind of get by, so to speak, lifestyle business. I'm doing workshops from time to time.

Speaker 1:

So I don't know if I'm on a soapbox here or not, but while we were in Vietnam I managed to connect a buddy of mine who was one of the top sales copywriters at Mindvalley, which is like a hundred million dollar company out of Malaysia. He was there, one of their top copywriters, and he was coming through Vietnam and we were going to meet up and we were like, hey, just for fun, let's do like a workshop together, let's like co-create some content and we'll record it, and maybe it'll be nothing and maybe it will, you know. So we put 55 people in a room in Hanoi and then he was traveling, we were going to move to Saigon. We're like, hey, let's do it again in Saigon. Yeah, let's do it. He couldn't do it. Event, he couldn't make it for his own travel plans changed Pre COVID but I did the workshop anyway And so I'm telling a bit of a story here.

Speaker 1:

But so this one guy came to the workshop and the guarantee was if you're not happy by lunch the lunch break let us know. Give you a full refund, all no, no, no, you know all good, and I had one guy do that. An older gentleman came. He said this is great content, but I'm no good with computer And this looks like you need to know how to like surf the internet and that. And he was an old timer, right, and I was like he's like. I thought maybe there's something I could do when I retire. I'm like, you know, you're a good man and everybody else is cool. So we eat my food for lunch. I finished the rest of the one day workshop.

Speaker 1:

At the end this guy is picking my girlfriend's brain because, while fresh out of university, no business background, while having a nursing a child from home, she grew a six figure. This is USD six figure. Business as a Filipino, filipino woman, fresh university, not like, no background in business, none of that. It was me kind of coaching and helping her while she was raising a big and so she had an agency and he couldn't do it successfully as a freelancer. And he's like, trapped in Vietnam teaching English, not making enough to go anywhere. So he's picking her brain.

Speaker 1:

After the event. We're packing up all this stuff After all. This buddy looks at me. He's like Hey, man, i need that refund, by the way, this has been great, but I need that refund. I was like now, but there's big announcement at lunch break. Before you know, i broke out all my food. He's like Yeah, but I use my rent money to come to this, so if you don't give that back, i'm not going to be able to pay my rent. And I'm like whatever, like this is just to help, whatever you know, cool, whatever. Bro, i'm a little peeved Like you take an advantage of me, but whatever.

Speaker 1:

Three months later, there's a lot of expat Facebook groups in Vietnam. Three months later, this guy is on Facebook promoting his entrepreneurship manifestation series, where he does workshops and meditation groups to help entrepreneurs Manifest the business of their dreams. And I was so livid because this guy, you know, he came and ate my food, he paid, you know what I mean And then he kept us like an hour late and we have a little kid It's not like we're just got nothing to do And then he's blogging, and this is at the now when he's doing this. This is like the beginning of the pandemic, right, at least in Vietnam. We Vietnam lockdown like first week of February.

Speaker 1:

Rest of the world was like what, what? but they have a land border with China. They do not have a long bitter history with China. They're like we don't trust you, what's going on? And they just shut the whole economy down. They're like you're doing it, we're doing it. Whatever We're in this together, we figure out who we can trust, and so I knew that there was going to be sharks in the water. I knew I could see then that this is going to be like a big thing, and I and I just it bothered me because when you're a business owner and this maybe is forgive my long rant story, but for the business owners listening like you have to make decisions on those decisions determine whether you can feed your family, your kids, your family, your kids, pay medical bills, school fees. You know the providers and some of the some of the stress out like we don't pay ourselves but we pay our staff And the knowledge that we make our decisions on is critically important. And I have some wannabe logging that he's a business expert. I just was so livid.

Speaker 1:

I first started this thing called the fake guru solution, where I hired these seven researchers. I'm like they are going to go through all the academic literature. We're going to find out what the science says. That are the keys, critical, key, critical success factors. The business were to come up with a way to measure it And we're just going to purge this industry of all the fake gurus out there. I did a preprint. I got my friends from all the like Queens University and universities in the States and like guys a PhD and one's a professor in Spain. Now I'm like we need to do this And we came up and we went through.

Speaker 1:

I spent 50 grand of my own money. Go through all these research pieces because lots of people studied success and they all come up with their own factor. Okay, cool. So we're going to say you're all right. What are all the factors you say that matter? And then what are the overlapping common denominator? And so we looked at hundreds of studies and a lot of these.

Speaker 1:

We specifically tried to find meta analyses. Meta studies And what a meta study is is if someone summarizes, like we were trying to do. We wanted to summarize all the research. Well, a meta analysis is that lots of different people will do meta analysis. So we tried to collect meta analyses and do like a systemic review. It's called of all the meta analyses because one meta analysis might be a hundred or a thousand studies summarize. And so I spent 50 grand to hire seven people, slash teams, because some were groups of two or three. Go through all this and try to make sense of it. We found eight critical success factor And then not only did we know the factors, we actually pulled from the literature quizzes to test someone's proficiency at it.

Speaker 1:

So why is this important? Because, as a business owner, you can just make up a quiz right, but you don't know if your questions are culturally biased. You don't know if the questions are leading right, if they're leading to the answer of that. So you have to do what's called validating your survey. You have to validate it for those things. So again, you know I'm just a monkey with a smartphone and I was like lots of people have done work Like right now.

Speaker 1:

None of us created laptops, joe Rogan says. If I left you alone in the woods, how long till you came out with a cell phone Right. Like none of us figured out the internet, electricity these laptops were all. I always think that when I'm driving down the road like, i am like living on the lives of other humans that went before me. Somebody slaved away in the sun all day, wasn't there with their kids to make this paved road so I could get where I'm going with speed, and I'm so grateful for that. So we went through the research and found measurement tools for these factors And then we drill down on each of the factors and figure out what makes those up.

Speaker 1:

There's all sorts of vague things like branding or leadership training, and I don't want to throw anyone under the bus. My intent is not to call anyone out for say it's to be like what is the truth, because that's what we need right, and in business you get paid for done. You get paid for being right, and that doesn't necessarily mean you wait for consensus. So you know. So that was it. So we looked at these eight factors. Should I go into the factors now, yeah, okay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's critical.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, okay, i can talk. Warn everyone here. I was a little kid that would wander away from my mom and she find me on a bench talking to an old lady, So you got to tell me when to breathe. You know, and just full disclaimer here. People, i'm here to give away the goods, to empower all of you. If anybody needs hand holding help, we do have programs in that available. But I mean, my daughter needs to grow up in a world that needs you at your best and you to be successful, like we really need that. Right, i'm a fan of competition. There's no, my whole life I've never known participation, awards and anything. That's just not. When you're an orphan, that just doesn't exist.

Speaker 1:

Let's talk about the eight critical success factors, and I'm going to talk about them in the order that I feel. They kind of stack on top of each other, but they're all necessary. So first I'm going to explain the eight critical success factors high level We give a couple of stories of businesses that failed due to failure of caring about some of these And then, if you want, we can drill into some of the pieces that make these up. Good Cory, you have your thumbs up approval. Okay, he's good, okay. Well, the eight critical success factors are self efficacy, market intelligence, strategic planning okay. Marketing strategy, sales strategy and sales skill, money management, business operations and business intelligence okay, now I've got a big kind of like spreadsheet with all the research studies. We don't need to go into that, but these are the factors that the umbrella category. So, like to kind of give an example, saudi Arabia did a study on critical success factors for small and medium-sized businesses. They said that individual factors mattered. Management factors mattered. The amount of business support, the amount of capital that they had available, was positively related to success in business. Two things were ineffective the characteristics of the business and the environment the business was in. That's just one. We did another. There's, like all these studies, harvard's done studies, all these studies. We tried to take those, like I said, map them out, make these umbrella category.

Speaker 1:

So self-efficacy is your ability to get things done via yourself and others, right. So some of these are really self-explanatory, some of them we need to break up. So once we had these eight categories, we tried to. You know what is peak performance in that. So self-efficacy is specific personality traits, leadership skills and personal disciplines. So, like a personality trait you need as an entrepreneur is extraversion right. We get paid to solve problems for people. If I am not willing to go meet new people, which is an extravert trait, i can be an introvert, but I have to do that extravert activity. I'm not gonna be very successful. It's gonna be harder for me Doesn't mean I can't. it's gonna be harder, so I have to demonstrate.

Speaker 1:

So again, when I talk about these things, it's not like you are doomed to fail because you're not an extrovert, it's. These are the things that right Everyone with me here. Growth mindset yay, okay. So locus of control That means being a control freak about what you can control.

Speaker 1:

As a business owner, you have to maintain quality, right. You've got the vision. I love the quote. You know, don't expect others to understand your grind when God didn't give them your vision right. Whether you're I'm not, i'm spiritual, not religious, but I just love that. It's your vision, right. So openness to experience, agreeableness, conscientiousness, acceptance of criticism and feedback These are personality traits that are positively correlated to success in business leadership skills.

Speaker 1:

So, again, it's a branding leadership, not trying to throw anyone under the bus, but there's a lot of people that we teach you leadership so you could be successful. Well, there's like a massive gap that you just assume to trust, like, okay, goal setting. For me, our research, goal setting is not a part of leadership, believe it or not. Not really, it's more of your strategic plan. Leadership is self-awareness skills, communication cooperation skills, emotional intelligence skills and adaptability. That's leadership. Leadership is about knowing yourself, knowing others, communicating effectively and being able to keep progress, moving forward despite challenges and obstacles. That is leadership. You see, the specificity that we got with these eight factors, right, like that was what we were really trying to get into. Just give me the fish, the things I got, because we've been doing business since we were, you know, exchanging shekels for the thing a week.

Speaker 1:

But when you look at business, the category like it shouldn't be this complicated, right, it just shouldn't be. And then there's personal discipline, like there's time management, but people don't recognize. There's also energy management. If you can only run one kilometer and then you're like I need to take a nap, that's your energy gas tank you bring to every day. I got up at 3 am today And it is almost 2 pm here And I'll be like this till I go to bed at like 8 pm. So you know if I can snap my fingers and take you from being able to run one kilometer to being able to run 10 kilometers. You now come to your day with 10 times more energy, intensity and focus, right. So that's just self-efficacy And I'm going into details on self-efficacy because it's the ones. That's not so self-explanatory Sales strategy and skills we put together because, like, mcdonald's does their selling in impulse level price points And they do most of their selling in you know the advertising and things like having a playground in there.

Speaker 1:

So you got to bring your kids. So their level of sales skills, their staff need, is really just order taking in Q and A. But if you're trying to sell airplanes or bridges, your sales strategy and the skills required are different. That's why we lump those together. Business operations is the other one we got questions about. It's the glue that holds things together. It's your meeting rhythms, your HR system, your hiring, onboarding, how you keep your team accountable, where you store your IP, cybersecurity, all that stuff. That's how you manage to operate. You know, like how you keep things moving down the road and the glue holding things together. Business intelligence are the dashboards, the feedback. How are we doing? You got your financials, great, but what else? And I can go into way more detail on all these eight, but I just I talk a lot, no one else has said anything but I, just high level. Those are the eight critical success factors.

Speaker 2:

I just want to jump in quickly, darrell, so that you can have a breath like breathe. Please have a sip of your water or coffee. And I just want to say, first of all, i love that story, and when you told me that I think you mentioned the story of the guy that came to that event and basically just you know, yeah, took all for himself and wheezed his way out of paying and then positioned himself as some guru a few months later, i was like gosh, the number of times I have seen these people and they position themselves as these experts, and this is it really gets my goat as well. And I love the way you were. I want to respond and go. You know what damn this. I want to figure out what success in business is really, what it really means, and you went and did it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, well, thank you, I appreciate that, you know, and it's not like necessarily these people are malicious, they're trying to find their way too. I had a friend I'm not going to mention any names I grew up with her in my hometown and she was like she lost her parents at a young age really tragic and unfortunate. She was the rich kid that we all knew growing up, because she also got an insane amount of life insurance money, and so she was like the kid coming to school in an SUV and we were just like applying for driver's licenses, you know type thing. And I remember I ran into her you know, we're older now, in our 20s, and I had found out that she had tried to have a yoga studio and it failed. I was like, oh, what do you? what do you do next? She's like, oh, i'm writing into, apply for a government grant. I'm like, oh, that's awesome. Yeah, okay, do it. Like we're from Canada, like, cool, what's your project? I want to start an entrepreneurship center to teach entrepreneurs how to be successful in business.

Speaker 1:

And I was like, wait, wait, wait. And I just I even said it. I was like so you failed at running a yoga studio, so you're applying for government financing So you can run a center to teach people how to be successful. And I just, i just like, left it Like I didn't. You know, whatever Karma is going to come around, it's going to work out for you. It's not going to work out. Leave it there. You know, but I was peeved Like at the time, at the then, i wasn't doing. Now I'm doing it. I'm like no one is, there's nothing to separate me from him. So, yeah, anyway. So the twisted lies to believe Again. I don't think it was malicious. No, right, she wasn't. She just couldn't see the forest from the trees. She was so close to it. Yeah, how might that be perceived by somebody else? You know?

Speaker 2:

But it's a good example of the fact that there is different people, different stages of their journeys, different levels of evolution, of education, of knowledge, of skills, and they're all there in this very unfiltered sort of society that we live in.

Speaker 1:

So And no one is really like getting up on stage And this is the part that makes it tough is someone has legitimate success, right, and they get up on stage and get asked to speak to share their story. I love this. There's this meme, it's like this guy's like he posts hey, i just had a call with someone on the Forbes 30 under 30 list And I came away really impressed. He shared with me how he made VP at a top tech company before the age of 30. Number one he gets up at 4.30 am every day. Number two takes a cold shower. Number three has a gratitude journal. Number four he starts every day with meditation. Number five his dad owns a tech company And it's like no one's sharing their tax records, right Like. And even then, as a business owner, your goal is to not make any money, right Like, cause then you're gonna. So it's just this weird fog like a war Who do you trust, who don't you trust? And that's where I was, like I have a track record, you know. I easily track and see I've helped people make millions and hundreds of thousands. And now I'm gonna layer on all this research on top of it too, cause I, you know, i don't know what. I don't know, and I've also had my own show that I've interviewed 400 experts And now I'm like, okay, and so our program, we actually turn that into daily, like a weekly habit log, so we can start you with the simple thing, one thing to track, and then build it, and then they morph.

Speaker 1:

Like you know you, a sleep log How many hours did you sleep You know, turns into creating a bedtime routine which incorporates two, three other things we try to have, you know. So sometimes we were like Darrell, how do you get up at 430 am every day? And like I have energy, i'm like you don't go to bed at midnight. Ta-da, like rocket science, captain, obvious, like you gotta, you gotta sleep. If you're doing a bed at midnight, trying to wake up at 3 am, you're doomed to fail. Like so, you know, but if common knowledge worked more, people would have six pack abs, million dollars in the bank. You know there is a deep state, there are conspiracies out there, but they're not holding us back as much as our own failings, you know So.

Speaker 2:

Totally. I got a question on the research. So when you went out to do the research, what was your definition of success?

Speaker 1:

Well, at the time we weren't. We were just trying to figure out like what are. Like we were lost in the fog at first, cause we're just trying to find the most authoritative research that they're like who can you trust? And then you get into things of certain people have a bias And so they pay for research on things. And then you know you really have to pick apart a study. You can't just go cause it's been published. Somebody else has back checked it for me, like you really can't, and they're you know you really can't. So in the beginning it was, it was more of what will the data reveal versus? you know we just want to know like, what are the lever? Like, is it all about sales? I mentioned I was going to tell some stories, so maybe I'll mention those to a couple of them.

Speaker 1:

Like one is Blockbuster versus Netflix. A lot of people like if I just could get sales going, i would reinvest my money in it. You know Blockbuster was doing six billion, that's a big billion dollars a year. Netflix was like a garage startup. They started off just like distributing catalogs and they would deliver the CDs, the DVDs, to your house like a pizza. You know Blockbuster six billion dollars that could have hired any talent, developed any tech. Right, they had every advantage. They had all these locations in the market. They had hundreds thousands of customers coming to their stores every day Netflix, a little mom and pop thing And they're like a garage that then goes into like a catalog mail order rental thing. Hey, what's this online stuff Like? and they ended up driving Blockbuster into bankruptcy, enron, right, because in the beginning, when I was starting off as an entrepreneur, i thought that you just got to get some money going and then you're good. No, there is a lot to it, right, i mean, i was so celebratory when I helped my first client do like a couple of million, but then I started helping other people and I was like I didn't even sell my old client. I was like money, money is not fixing everything. There's other problems to worry about. You know, enron made a hundred and one billion dollars a year before they filed for bankruptcy. I mean, i know there's people listening to this going like I just need like a hundred grand and I'm good for the year. That company couldn't go a year on a hundred and one billion dollars. So money alone doesn't guarantee success, right? Newspapers, newspaper subscriptions used to be considered rivers of gold And then, when blogs came out, they started drying up and it became a matter of who has enough money. You know what I mean. Like they got, they lost touch with the market And that's why these things are in this.

Speaker 1:

You know, self efficacy. Elon Musk says if you work a hundred hours a week and your competitor only works 40, you'll just at work them, and that it's true, but not it's not a one trick pony, like you know. Again, we talk about Blockbuster, major company, six billion people and they small mom and pop shop, Like I think, even now Netflix I don't know the number specifically, but Netflix Netflix is something like 10 times the profit with like a team of 40, 60 people, whereas Blockbuster had like a couple thousand staff. So you know, there's just a lot of ways that can go sideways. Um, they, yeah, so they lost touch. So self efficacy is really important because even if you know the right things to do, if you don't get them done right Or if your team is lacking, then you're just not going to get it done right.

Speaker 1:

Health issues how, you know, there's been businesses that could have changed the world, but the owner was sick and died, you know, like Nikola Tesla is a great example. That man was a gift to humanity and he didn't make it for the long run, you know. So what did we lose? So self efficacy is at the core. Then you have to have your market intelligence, because problems are market. Okay, the problem is what, like, we get paid for solving problems.

Speaker 1:

I'm hungry, restaurant, i'm bored, go to a movie, so it's, it's a problem. You know. It's typically experienced as emotional pain, but often it can be physical too, like my teeth hurt, right, but there's pain you can endure and pain that's emotionally unbearable. And then there's, you know, if that pain was like a pond. There's a pond, or a lake of pain. Well, around every lake there's lots of different birds and some birds eat it. Some birds eat berries, some birds eat, you know, other birds, so some birds eat fish. So you'll have a problem.

Speaker 1:

And then you have different stereotypes experiencing that problem. One could be as simple as job hunting. You have homeless people that need work and you've got high powered, overly paid, potentially. You know corporate CEOs that are looking for another overly paid, high profile position. The problem is the same. I got to help this person find work. I want to save the world as much as everybody. These people have two different capacities to pay for a service. So then you identify them via a stereotype. You know I help this stereotype person solve this problem. So that's the basis of what the business is built on.

Speaker 1:

You know you can try all the mental gymnastics you want, but you know if people don't want to I mean, blockbuster was in the business of helping me relax on my time off I don't want to drive to a place, then go stand on my feet after I've been standing for 10 hour shift as a waitress right And then have to try to paralysis by analysis. Choose out of these 70,000 things. I want to sit at home with a cup of tea or beer or something. Look through a catalog, dial a phone number, have it come to me. You know, but that's just the disconnect from the problem that they were solving Vlogs. I mean this is happening again.

Speaker 1:

You, your listenership is probably here because they're like I'm not getting anything from mainstream media that's serving my life in any way, shape or form And we're going through a huge and now they're trying to pass laws to control. It's like it's a stupid game of cat and mouse, but it's really just help people, that's help people, you know. So yeah, i digress. I should let you guys interject. I was interjected some point, but you know that's why I shared those in those order, in that order, because once you've done, you know you are high functioning unit, you know you've got your market intelligence style.

Speaker 1:

Then now it's your strategy to reach them. You know, today would be a bad day and age to sell fax machine as your primary business. That's strategically not very strategic, right? I mean, maybe it is, i don't know. Maybe they're more. But then what's the problem you're solving? Is it data security? I don't know, but you know.

Speaker 1:

So it's the whole concept. Is the market growing, shrinking? Is there a technology that's coming out? It's going to make you obsolete. That's the strategy. And then you have to get it out there. Right, your marketing strategy. You got your strategic plan how you're going to offer a unique, better, faster, cheaper. You know, typically two out of the three, now two, but not all three. It's hard to deliver on all three if you can, but better, faster, cheaper. Better, but it's not cheaper, you know, or it's better and faster but not cheaper, or it's better and cheap but it's not fast. Like you know, you got to pick two out of three and then you know. And then every time a new business comes out, their goals to try to solve the problem better than you. You know.

Speaker 2:

So And Breeze.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, sorry. When you're so quiet over there. What do you think it?

Speaker 2:

I can see. I can see you can see your brain going. Yeah, He'll jump in and tick. I know he revs up and then he'll just unleash when you least expect it. So I got a question When did you know that you wanted to serve businesses? How early on was that in your life? Great.

Speaker 1:

Great question. I loved it. So I was just happy. I've been running my martial arts school and that was I did. I was a freelancer in Japan. I lived in Tokyo three years. You know I'd done kind of like summer I don't know if it's a franchise, but like color was a college painter pro or whatever I'd like had a newspaper. Like I've done little things shoveling driveways, but my first business I really feel like was a holy mine was my martial arts And one of the things that really energized me about it the most was the testimonial, having people come into the school.

Speaker 1:

Like there was a girl that got some guy I was getting you know to touchy at the nightclub. She defended herself Guard's game, took him out. She was like the hero of her friend, like wow girl, like you know, like she just she said it was like a movie That just changed, you know, her life. I had a friend. He had a drinking problem. I known him for a long time. He was the kind of guy that would like at the end of a party he go around and finish all the half finished drinks at the part, like before I go home I just got a. I think it was bad, and then, you know, he came and he it forced him to stay sober. He's like my wife's proud of me, my kids are proud of me, my parents are proud of me, you know, and we weren't kids at the time when this happened right Like we're all grown adult now, you know. So I just love those, i love that. I love that so much And I was spending everything that I had on trying to make this business work and make sure I was doing the right things.

Speaker 1:

But I was talking to him, a lot of my friends that were small business owners, one was a florist, another was a mechanic. Another guy was running a satellite office in Kingston Ontario for a company They said an Ottawa called Ottawa kiosk. And then he messaged me I was, i was, i just I was about to go to Japan for a month. I'd sold this, i did a promotion travel train, japancom. So it was go to Japan and then 30 days do like the highlights of what I did in three years. And we're going to go to this Hicks and Gracie tournament. You're going to get to meet Hicks and Gracie, the living legend, blah, blah, blah, blah blah. I was about to. I was like leaving in a day and Corey called me. He's like Darrell, i just got promoted. I'm CEO of a million dollar company. Man, like bro, amazing Cause we used to his his.

Speaker 1:

His office was like above my martial arts school. So we would go to this Canada. So you know, some people like marijuana more than alcohol. We would just go and get very creative and, like he had these massive whiteboards and I would just like whiteboard all this stuff, i was like, no, you don't understand. They gave me, they made me CEO based off of our ideas. I've never been CEO before. So I'm putting you on a retainer. I'll pay 2,500 a month and you just need to listen in on some calls and be like my advisor a couple of times a week. I was like, okay, well, i'm gone for a month, let me think about it. Get back to you.

Speaker 1:

While I was gone, i realized I was thinking about on the plane, talking to some of the other people. Come with me, like Darrell And I actually one of my students. Somebody realized this. He's like you know, darrell, how many members do we have? And I was like, oh, about 150, 170 somewhere in there. Well, how many is that like average for a business? And I said, well, maybe, yeah, like a business needs you know, bakery needs probably needs a few hundred people. He's like so then, darrell, if you were helping a hundred business owners, wouldn't you be having an exponential impact on the world? And I was like, yeah, that, like you know, and I don't need to see all the testimonials and reviews, i just want my life to have meaning And that's kind of what first got me into that.

Speaker 1:

So I came back and I was dating an English teacher at the time And so I got free editing services. While they weren't free, i had to. I had to anyways, anyways for the adults later. So she helped me write. I call them business books for busy people And so they're just like 50 page books. But I wrote two two were books And one was actually a workshop kind of note, like a workshop assist manual, and we put them on Amazon and one of them started to pick up ancient secrets of lead generation, your guide to better leads with less effort. And I just practicing what I preach. I marketed it and I got it to hit number one on Amazon for the top 100 marketing and sales, number seven for the business category overall, you know, and there's up there with classics, like you know think and grow rich, and how to win friends and influence people. I mean, it's not like I held that spot for a year I didn't, but I hit that And then I used that screenshots that get on local television and radio.

Speaker 1:

And then I had a bunch of local business owners that approached me and I put a business coaching group together And then, through the great vine and people I knew, i actually got an offer to go to San Diego. I got offered $90,000 US a year, plus 2.5% of everything I helped them make, and a $25,000 signing bonus. So I use the signing bonus to pay back anyone that had prepaid their membership from my martial arts school because it was in a university town So it was very seasonal in the sense that everyone went home for the summer. I paid back all the paid and full people. I paid off my lease. I went because I was interested in building the skills And then I blew my mind is when I went it was a fully online business.

Speaker 1:

So if you had a credit card and an internet connection and you, you know like you could be a customer, and so it really rocked my world because I just used what I had applied to help grow my business and my friends local small businesses, but I applied it to one where you know there was just more zeros attached to everything we'll say And you know we did 1.6 million in eight months, 3.2 as a company as a whole turned them around for being on the verge of bankruptcy. And you know I just replicated that success a couple more times. I've been working remote since 2015, ish, so I don't know if I answered that or went on another rant.

Speaker 3:

Holy cow, i even don't know how to start and where to start to ask questions. I hope that's a good thing.

Speaker 1:

I hope that's a good thing. Listen, I've got a question.

Speaker 3:

I mean, i love the fact that, despite of becoming livid with the guy who pretend to be just an attendee and then turn out to be a fake guru, yeah, it's amazing how you can analyze your anger and put it all into these major studies to figure out what are the eight key critical success factors, and which shows me that you're predominantly focusing on clarity and transparency to give business to people, and one of the biggest challenges, in fact, is self-awareness and how to become yourself and presenting yourself as you just do, because you are extremely authentic and definitely much more energized than I am.

Speaker 3:

I thought I'm already an energized person. So how do you experience business people? and how do you get to the business people when they try to tap into their own genius rather than keep comparing themselves, their business with others and trying to be cheaper or better, instead of reminding the self what is so unique about me and how can I get that out into the world? So how do you cope with these things? How do you help people to do that? Because I think this is the, this is the quintessence, this is the secret. Yeah, and not the little things that you're tapping into.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, i think that's a great question. I think some of it comes into introspection. You know so, in terms of you know when you're when, whenever the world seems in chaos, you have to go back to fundamental and introspection. You know, like, so what does that mean? That means they have to learn about themselves, their strengths and weaknesses, their team strength and weaknesses, and then they need to focus on their customer, because there might be a competitor that's way better than them. But remember, we talked fast, better, cheaper.

Speaker 1:

You know cheap is a tough one to make it in because there's there's no protection from someone else coming in trying, even if they're suicidal, from offering for less. You know, and they might be suicidal, but they're going to upset you. You know they're going to knock over your Apple cart in the process of killing themselves. So cheap is not necessarily a good way to come in. So you have to figure out why do they choose you? Is it a convenience option? Is it like what would like your customer? So the competitors can do. It's almost. You know, i'm trying to think of a good quote, but I'm not really. It's just what matters are the people that are paying you money? Are you happy? What do you want from me. A lot of times people work with you. There's all these new AI tools coming out. It doesn't mean that anybody that's a writer has lost their job overnight. Some of them are having dialogues Like hey, what does this mean? Can we do better faster? you know, can we do more better, faster? So it's just dialing in on the people you serve, why they come to you or someone else You do.

Speaker 1:

It doesn't mean you can't ignore the world, though. I mean we live in a physical world. That's got you know. Like, in some ways, i feel like that's almost put that aside. I feel like it's a disadvantage.

Speaker 1:

People get so caught up in our constructed society. You know, like weekends You look outside, there's birds in the bees. None of them are like there's no bird out there. That's like, hey, cat, it's Saturday, you gotta come chase me. Monday. I'm on my weekend. Like I'm just you know, there's no, there's no squirrel. That's like oh, it's Friday, i'm not gonna worry about eating, it's gonna go play with my friends. Like it is a daily grind This whole weekend holiday. That's us Like we are outside the food chain. People forget that. Like we are the only beings. Like maybe we are the extraterrestrial, because we don't fit into the food chain of this planet, right. So I mean, that was just a joke.

Speaker 1:

But though it's really about you know. How do you you know? how can you this like fight club if you've never been in a fight? how can you know everything about yourself? So you gotta know yourself. You have to put yourself in different situations. You can do all sorts of personality tests, right, but then it just it really comes down to like trying to find your icky guy, which is kind of your reason for living. What you would do even if money wasn't an issue, and then marry that with something the problem people need are willing to pay to have. I don't know if that answers it well enough, but it comes like icky guy. I think is a good figure out their icky guy and then try to overlap it onto something that is a problem people are willing to pay to help it fix Cause it's not just product market fit, it's product market founder fit. Otherwise, it's like the book report you just don't want to get done Right, that you could do in five minutes, but you don't do.

Speaker 2:

I was just looking for my book that has the icky guy in it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Do you want to explain the?

Speaker 1:

icky guy for people that don't know what it is.

Speaker 2:

Yes, it is four circles and they all intersect. It's kind of like a genius model. But what is it? What I get paid for, what I'm the genius or really good at, what people need is that right? And I've just been doing it with a client? and the fourth one is help me out here, darryl. What's the fourth one? I'm not even sure.

Speaker 1:

It's just what you love, icky guy, to me is just your passion. It's just a thing that you just seven hours went by and you're still fully engaged. You can't necessarily get paid for that, but maybe there's a subset, an overlap, a transferable skill Yeah, that's it And where that fits into the world.

Speaker 2:

What does the world need? Right, Where I can sit there for seven hours and the time just blinks by because I'm just so in the zone in flow?

Speaker 1:

Right, right, right, right, 100%. Clearly I can do that with talking, are you guys still?

Speaker 2:

here. That's great, that's great, anyway, no kidding.

Speaker 3:

There are coming back what you said, that you just really want to help business owners to overcome the challenges mental barriers, whatever it is. Why is it so hard for people to believe in that you really have a genuine interest to help them to turn around the business? What is it? Is that a combination of their history, their past and their lack of belief in the goods, in people? What would you say?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's tough because when you're a business owner and it doesn't matter what you do, but let's say first you're just trying to figure out like what am I supposed to even be doing? Often people will have they love baking and everyone loves their pie. You should open up a bakery. And so they're like, yeah, and then the vision it's like their dream house, my dream logo and all this. And so part of why getting help might be tough is because when they share their dream with people, they don't see it or they criticize it and that hurt. So we just protect it, right.

Speaker 1:

The other part is we don't want to admit. I mean admit, you know. They say success, as many fathers, but failure is an orphan Like. Nobody wants to be attached to a failure. So to come forward and admit flawed is really difficult for people. Public speaking is like one of the biggest fears. So admitting publicly that you're struggling with anything it can be a huge challenge. So there's part of that right.

Speaker 1:

I think that's a big part of it, that willing to admit. They say women tend to get more, are more open to coaching than men. Typically because of that there's more of a hierarchy with men, you know like in that way. So I think it's part of it. But also just it's kind of built in Like if I have a hair salon and you have a hair salon and we serve the same community, i can't be, i can't call you, be like, hey, corey, sales are down this month, what are you doing? Because you don't want me to copy you verbatim, right? So there's that too. So it's like inherently there's it's an adversarial relationship with your competitors. So who do you open up to to share your trade secrets and your weaknesses? So that can be part of it too. Right, i think that's probably a lot of it.

Speaker 1:

And then there's just the. I can figure it out on my own. A lot of us have been abused by different authority systems. So there's it's a tough and it's like I said, like it's just it's made to be so kind of semi complicated. You know, like vague, you go get an. I've clients that have MBAs And then they're like I really need to figure out how to make this thing work. Like I know how to work in a big company, but I would make a small business work And I just can't help the thing. Like you didn't get that for your 50, 100k education. They couldn't you know like there's, it's just. It just doesn't need to be the mystery. It's just a bunch of BS layered on top of other stuff. Make people.

Speaker 1:

I don't know, maybe my thing sounds complicated, but I'm not sure. It's a mix of all that stuff And it's a fear. It's a fear of failure, you know. But the problem is that I think a lot of reason why, a big part of why businesses fail is I mean, if hard work was enough, more people would be successful. What happens is I'll go through my original analogy Somebody makes big spies. We love them. You should. You should open up a business. Okay, they'd come with their dream logo, their dream menu, they're all the furniture. Oh, i'll be in this area. This is a great part of town. Oh, i got this great unit. It's got a beautiful view.

Speaker 1:

None of this is about serving the people that are gonna have to pay you every month So you can afford to build. So that's the flip of it, right Like it's about serving a community, and so a lot of people they get into business for their own interests and that's where they're so attached to it. It's an emotional thing, it's my baby, right. So what happens is that they open their bakery and all their friends and family have to come make the obligatory purchase. But for family A, it's just really out of the way to go there. They love them and they would do more business, but it's just an extra trip and they just don't need blueberry pie that much. So it's like they launched to get these sales. Now they're so busy doing.

Speaker 1:

We call Feaster Famine Mode, they're so busy doing. There's no one bringing more people in. Now there's no work, we're starving. Let's go find some people. Oh, we get a. You know, hey, we're gonna cater this event. Okay, now we're busy again, but there's no more people coming. And now we're famine again, and it's the seesaw that people go through, and then it's like the fumbling around. So you figure it out.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yes, yes and yes, totally Okay. So what does your ideal future look like? I guess what are you helping to create, because you obviously were inspired to pay for that research with those eight researchers and you wanted to create something. And I want to link back to when you were on the plane with your martial arts people and you looked at the whole and you got that insight about well, if I have 170 martial arts students, what would it look like if I had that in a business, you know consulting sort of scenario, and then I could make a lot bigger impact. So you obviously had that imprint. You went out to do the research for a reason You wanted to get some truth. that's obviously going somewhere. So I'd love to know what, where you're going with this. what do you want to achieve?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so they have missions to help create two new multi-million dollar businesses, because I really feel that that you know an ethical business that's just going to bring up the community around them and the people. Yousuf Mohammed, i think his name was, he was the godfather of the whole micro lending industry. I'm sorry I might make as look bad as men, but they did a study in India and they found that when small communities were helped we're talking like poor, like really poor right, like where they need a loan to get a goat make more milk. You know that. You know small, small, like super small businesses, third world small, small, small business type thing. When these communities were helped, the aid when the women became successful, they paid school fees for school fees for kids and the medicine and training for the men. They repaired the houses, you know. They saved money for a later day. They bought tools for the men. They loaned money to relatives and stuff that needed help. When men were successful, they spent it on women drinking drugs, travel, and so micro finance industry was really focused on empowering women in communities. Sorry, corey and all the other male listeners, so that's, that's what sparked the whole micro finance kind of industry, was that? and it wasn't like it was exclusive to women only, right, but it was just that there was a notice, noticeable impact on that And I just always wanted to be a force for good.

Speaker 1:

So I did the research because I wanted to know. I knew that the pandemic was going to have big ramifications. I wanted to fill gaps in my knowledge, but also that's part of what I was selling, and I had a good track record and I wanted to maintain that track record. You know, i also spent a couple of years. I took a mini retirement, like I went. I literally went to a honeymoon tropical island with very remote access via phone, internet. It's very easy to not be reachable by anybody, like palm trees, beaches, coconut, like. I did that for a couple of years, you know, and it was just like what am I going to do next? Like what's next thing? Money didn't really motivate me. So then it was just about really helping people And again, if every business represents a few hundred people, i could have my life make an exponential impact on the world. And I just wanted to make sure I had something unique, something credible, beyond just you know, darryl seems like a nice guy And something that would really make a difference Because, like I said, i feel like we're on the worlds on.

Speaker 1:

I'm very optimistic about the future, but I feel like there's two directions we can go in where we can regress to, like the ancient times, where you know there was the have, the family, the royal family, and then everybody that served them or was beheaded, you know, and then we've got a really bright future and almost I feel like we're on the precipice of a new golden era And some of the things that we're seeing with media and with perhaps parasitic relationships between governments and big pharma, as an example of an industry that that could maybe be dangerous or a species somehow that examples just theoretical examples, like big food and big pharma passing people back and forth to turn them into an ATM for life, i just things like that. I just think that we're really on the verge of a new golden era and new technology. I don't know what we're going to do. Like there's universal basic income sounds great, but I know right. So capitalism and communism is a battle in my mind between equality and freedom. I got those backwards. But in a communist society, everyone is equal but no one is free, because there is no reward for being better or a higher producer. But in a free society then you are not all equal and you can have then have generational advantages and monopolies because they get so far ahead. And I almost feel like it's this yin yang where it's like left foot, right foot, left foot, right foot, where we kind of fumble, trying to hobble forward as a society because, like, any extreme of anything is bad. So I don't know. I'm optimistic about the future. I want to help create 200 new multimillion dollar businesses And so I go around to do interviews and give this info away for free.

Speaker 1:

I was a high paid consultant. I did high paid group coaching programs. I know that's not necessarily affordable for everybody And I know that we've got emerging economies. I think Indonesia's got something almost like 300 million people, booming middle class, and all these people we have to help them all. We have to help them all. I mean people talk about overpopulation of the planet. The best thing you do is help someone access power. I just could be here, corey, by the way, and earn some money So they're not worried about their kids dying off and paying for medicine And people. There's a lot less primes of desperation. Everyone lives a better life. So that's really what I'm about to do, and so people can take it and run If they want help.

Speaker 1:

We have a program called Habit Hero where it's just business coaching and mentorship done via daily habit tracking and weekly challenges. We have a habit tracker. You can either use the site to track it or print off the PDFs every week and check it off on your wall. There's points for which you get done versus not in the leaderboard And we try to make sure that everyone's focus is on everything And that way, even if you sell airplanes and this person's a corporate office cleaner, the cleaning service, you might not be able to compete in terms of revenue you make. But hey, did you do your bedtime routine yesterday? Did you get any leads today? Hey, are your dashboards set up? Did you check your dashboards today? Things like that. There are universal things that we can all do. You might do Pilates, I might do CrossFit, someone else might like to water ski, i don't know. But did you do something for your body today for 30 minutes? So there's these universal things that we put in the habit tracker to help people And that's it.

Speaker 1:

I just want to help the world, get paid doing it and just have a bunch of kids build my. We already have lots, but we're paying off. I've got almost all the solar panels I need downstairs. I've been researching this stuff since I was 19. We're going to be, you know, live off water from the sky with solar panels, grow some food, a couple of chickens. You know, this is all. It's all already working. So it's not like I need $7 million to retire. It's not the plan, you know.

Speaker 1:

The plan is to just be interdependent with society. you know, versus hope, the government will provide everything for me, Like no, no, no, no, no. We're going to be an old man with a bunch of grandkids and a garden to tend to and maybe some animals, and we're going to own the land that we're on and have some big guns to guarantee that. You know, stays that way. And I'm just going to, you know, just take care of my grandkids and my food, fix the roof, make sure the system, the water system, works. You know we got power and make money online and, at the same time, figure out some offline things to do just to serve communities.

Speaker 1:

I mean, that's I had to talk with my friend We're talking about. I'm going to say this and then shut up, but I talked with my friend. This guy does like a million a month. We're talking about changes in currencies, reserve currencies, all this stuff, and him and I both agree unanimously, without question agreed that, despite the money he's making, despite having been invited to have dinner with Obama and you know if I don't care if you're a Obama fan or not, no one's inviting me to the White House for a private dinner, let's just say okay, but his and his family's best security, regardless of what happens.

Speaker 1:

Moving forward, the fact that he has 6,000 people every month that come to him for help with something, that's it. It's as simple as that. That he helps them with a problem that's going to be there, even if the currencies change. There's a war going somewhere, who knows? people are going to need help with this And I have 6,000 people that come to me every month for help with this. And if all they can pay me with is potatoes and they're just going to pay with potatoes If all they can do is cut my hair for me, for me and my kids but I have 6,000 of those people We will be okay. And so that's all I'm trying to do is just build a community that I can serve and, you know, spend my off time helping make babies and raise them.

Speaker 2:

That's a great life goal, vision, all the rest of it. By design, working on it By design, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, working on it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. So, we know, to auto water and working on the whole thing.

Speaker 2:

We'll have to talk more about that offline. I have a question. This is the 6 star business podcast. So when you first heard and we met and we talked about the podcast and you thought about what 6 star is, what came to you? What does it mean to you?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, i just think 6 star is being committed to your customers as best as you can, right, so your isn't always right, just as if your child can throw a tantrum and just be, you know. But at the same time, 6 star is just about that. So markets are constantly evolving. How many people are in market right now for a new house? That is, it's unknown and unknowable. You can have estimates, we have estimates on that, right, how many are coming and going. But excellence is recognized by everybody And so to me, 6 star means pursuing excellence in solving the problem you've, you know you're trying to solve for people and staying true to that. And that also means adapting and evolving. Because, right, none of us organizes meeting the fax machine. So if you're just in the business of manufacturing fax machines, that's you're going to, you're going to become a relic, so that's you have to stay focused on serving. You know solving that problem and serving people more, more excellently than everyone else, and that's that's really all you could really hope for. You know over deliver.

Speaker 2:

Love it. What do you see is the one of the biggest barriers to achieving that for people?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's people. When they sell out of people, when they start business, they're not coming to it as business minded people. They're coming to it as someone that wants maybe more independence or is unemployable because they're not super obedient if the rules don't make sense to them. So I think that's a huge obstacle. And then the rest is just there's some prep work. Like you do need a period of roof and ramen. Like you need you need some time where you're just getting by, you can. You got a couple of hot noodles So you're somewhat nourished, you got a roof over your head So that way you can talk to people, get rejected by people, have some customers, get some experience, hear something out. So I think part of it is that there's like a lack of awareness of the industry or the landscape of people's options. They haven't bought their competitors products, they haven't interviewed enough of their customers. You know they're just having. They're not on the. You know they're not an industry expert per se, they're just good. You know the land of the blind, the one-eyed man, is king, you know. So I cut grass for my grandpa every Saturday and now I got a grass cutting business, you know. But so it's. You know there's partially that. And then there's the.

Speaker 1:

I think business is also very Shakespearean where in Shakespeare's plays, the main characters always fell victim to their greatest flaw, that they often didn't address, and I think that's important. That's, you know. That's part of why I put the eight critical success factors together, because it's like, whatever you are neglecting is what will do you in right, like that's. It's that simple. It just will, maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but someday and for the rest of your life, kid, you're going to you know so. Thank you, i think they answered it. I mean, i could talk a lot more, but And don't feel bad about talking.

Speaker 2:

That's why you're here, by the way.

Speaker 1:

I know, i know.

Speaker 2:

I know, And I love hearing people talk, especially those that are passionate about what they do, and you are passionately personified. What would you say? your genius is Darrell.

Speaker 1:

You don't have to ask other people. I don't even know. Have you asked them? I don't even know. In different ways. That's something I probably need to do again, but I'm not sure.

Speaker 1:

I'm just very committed to results and truth. Whether, like you know, i've talked with friends and they already know, like they tell me point blank, like don't sugarcoat anything, just I'll go cry about it. What I care more about is progress and truth. You know, i don't know what my superpower is. Probably people dealing with people doing this. You know, i try to delegate all the things that I'm not good at and build a team And, you know, share profits when I can. So empathy, maybe that's the superpower I really care.

Speaker 1:

It bothers me Like that. It triggers me, even now when you're talking about, like that guy, like it's not even I don't even care, like he's not going to be more, like my bills are paid, so I'm not worried about that guy running a workshop And now I'm out of business. It's that I know that there's good people that are going to. Just, you know, plug into him and just be. You know, yeah, or I can't hear you, but I know, i know what you're saying. I didn't have to hear it. You know, like, i just know that And I've been that guy, I've like I spend the two grand on the weekend seminar and I go and I'm like I got one idea, which is a great idea, but I don't think it's too grand. I've spent the three weeks to read the book. That's like that should have been one chapter. You know what I mean. I've been in the back room and this is maybe why I'm a bit more unknown.

Speaker 1:

I've been in the back room when I was in California, some of these big gurus you know, there was a barbecue or a bunch of them were planning the promotion calendar, marketing calendar, and I'm making up a bunch of names. But it's like, jerry, you're, we're going to launch your product in September. You know, Francine, we're going to march, launch yours in October. You know what the product is, if it works. But these are like big name people. And then you see the launches happen and you see some comments, people, i tried it, it didn't work for me. Oh you, boss, and I blah, blah, blah, because so and so said and so and so you've got like four big names endorsing a product and the little guy that's just trying to make it, he just two kids he bought it didn't work. He leaves a negative review but it's swamped out because big name person and gives it the gold sticker.

Speaker 1:

I hate that. You know. I've been that again. I was an orphan. I mean I was fortunate enough I had roof and ramen but I didn't get any. Like no one paid my school fee. You know what I mean. So as someone that's been paying my own bills since I was 1617, like I got no patience for that stuff. So I take that very seriously. And especially when people come to me why, like you guys, want to ask me about any of those eight factors, i can go to studies details.

Speaker 2:

That's how you do it, you know but you know, just from this short conversation I'd say, one of your superpowers is understanding humanity.

Speaker 1:

Thank you.

Speaker 2:

Thank you Appreciate that You're welcome And in that you have a really clear bullshit, rate up Oh well, maybe, maybe I'm sure I've been fooled.

Speaker 1:

I just know I'm a monkey with a smartphone or I try not to trust myself. You know, that's really really all it is. I'm a monkey that's got a smartphone, i don't. There's a great book called the beginning of infinity. It's not a light read. It really is not. It's very much like a book you got to read two, three times. And I read it two, three times.

Speaker 1:

And this guy is a godfather of quantum computing And he does this great explanation of what science is. Science is a specific explanation that's hard to vary. So because if I, if you go, well, okay, so I mean, you know people, people want to ask about the Garden of Eden And what about this? Well, it's out of context What it does. You can change the variables so well And the story is still the same.

Speaker 1:

There used to be like why do we have seasons? Because some Greek goddess was kidnapped and she's locked away in the eighties and gets raped, and so the world is sad, and that's why I went, but she gets to go home and visit her mom. But if, if they had seen that there's different hemispheres, that culture would have changed that myth, it'd make a new explanation. But you couldn't do that. So, like one of the reasons we used to think we were the center of the universe because that's what it looks like Everything revolves around us. But part of how we figured out not was Galileo had a theory that was proven by a later astronomer, and it was by observing the phases of Pluto. So just like we have a full moon and a half moon and a crescent moon, not Pluto, venus Venus has phases too. So when we had a telescope and we could measure, the only explanation that worked to explain why those phases of Venus work is that Venus was going around something other than Earth, and so that's a specific explanation that's shown with mathematical formulas, even, and geometry to show that this explanation is the only way that that result can happen. It is such a specific description that if you change anything, it no longer matches up with reality In science.

Speaker 1:

Carl Popper was one of the earliest science educators. He said there is no scientific method. There is no way to guarantee scientific breakthroughs. If there was, we would have more of them and predictable interviews. But what we have is a method that we use to stop fooling ourselves, and it is a formula p1 plus ps plus ee equals p2.

Speaker 1:

Problem one plus temporary solution, plus eliminating the errors, which we do through observation, experimentation, debate, criticism, right. Once you've eliminated all the errors, you now arrive at problem two, or you're still at problem one, but you've learned more about it, and that's why things like free speech and censorship are such important things. That's why I'm Canadian, but it's still why free speech is the first amendment. If you're working from an incomplete data set, you will not, you are not able to get the best explanation that's possible. So when things are censored, when you're not allowed to talk about certain things, that limits the data working, data set that you have. It's like a movie when you're yelling at the character like, oh, he's behind the door, and you're yelling because you know watching the movie but the character doesn't. That's why free. You need free speech because that's, you know, prevented our.

Speaker 1:

We've had more progress since the early 1900s to now. I forget who it is, tim, something. You wrote this book and in it one of the pages is like if humanity was a thousand-page story, all of our history of this planet, if it was fit. If it fit on a thousand pages, everything that we've done since, like we've, we stopped being an agricultural based species is like the last three sentences on the last page of this thousand page novel, so everything we've accomplished is such a short window in time, you know. So we don't know what the great filters are for humanity and our species and that. So we just got a, you know, evidence and compassion. If we can just work from those two principles, what does the evidence say though, all the evidence, and you know, from a heart of compassion and love, let's move forward. And if we could just keep those fundamental, we'll be all right, right.

Speaker 2:

What a beautiful mission way to move forward, isn't it for anybody? Yeah, Beautiful, We're coming to the end. Coray, have you got any questions or comments for Darryl?

Speaker 3:

I'm not very often speechless, but this is one of the occasions where I got speechless and having troubles to describe what I just experienced over the last hour. But since you are not able to describe yourself, i would say just you're truly entrepreneur. I mean, you are smart, sharp, knowledgeable, wise. Yeah, you are passionate. Multiplied with whatever x 100. And what I, what I sense, what I listened, which is one of the biggest challenges for you as well as for me, is coping with injustice. This is this is for me as well the overkill, yeah, and and yeah, a good hearted approach, true empathy to cope with people, to tune into them and then literally help. This, today, is the humanized society. To go back to the roots, yeah, in helping, supporting each other, nurturing, fostering each other. Yeah, i think this is a unique you are unique gift to us And thank you for being our guest.

Speaker 1:

Thank you for you know, putting this on I mean you guys organize it and tons of interviews before you'll do tons more after me. So I'm just grateful that I can come and serve for this short period of time. Hopefully it helps some people out. Yeah, because we all surely? Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it really will. And I know you know Kori will agree with me when I say you speak to the heart of who we are and our values and our soul of six star And and that's why, when I first met you, i was like so excited. I'm like this is this is why I have this podcast. Like to meet people like this and to be able to have you just give of yourself so freely. That truly is six star, selfless. And you're doing this for other people. You're not doing this for yourself And, yes, you get the rewards from it, but it's not your initial intention to just serve yourself. And, yeah, i'm just really grateful for your time and everything you've given me. Now I do have one last question.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, i'm here to serve, I know.

Speaker 2:

So this is, this is the question for our listeners Is there something that you'd like to leave them with? Is there a piece of gold, a little snippet, a little takeaway, something you've learned along the way that you think would just help them maybe get over that hump or that fear, or getting outside of their, you know, mental loops, or whatever it is?

Speaker 1:

Well, i use what I can do. I can share with you guys. if we have time, i can share a couple of things that I read every day. They're not ones maybe going to take me 20 seconds to read. the rest are pretty quick. So these are things that I just read myself every day, just trying to help myself.

Speaker 1:

my asmr price. So we already talked about the critical success factors. Now, as a business owner, what's your role? So you know, in a lot of ways you want to delegate as much as you can. So you're calling the shots, analyzing the stats, optimizing and communicating. So that means optimizing for quality control and communicating with your new clients, your staff. you know vendors, your existing clients. That's one thing that I read every day. like what's my role in the business? We wear many hats, but at the end of the day, your role is to serve the end user and your job is to facilitate that event for them, right? So I think that's an important one.

Speaker 1:

Another thing that I read every day. I love this quote every morning in Africa, when the sun comes up, a gazelle wakes up. It knows must outrun the fastest lion or it will be killed. Every morning in Africa, when the sun comes up, a lion wakes up. It knows must outrun the slowest gazelle or it will starve to death. The moral of the story is it doesn't matter if you are a lion or a gazelle when the sun comes up it better be running.

Speaker 1:

And I think that's a really good analogy for life, where I talk about like there's just no such thing as a weekend. You know you can get burnt out, but that means that you're not pacing yourself well enough. Right, like my day looks the same every day except Sundays. I kind of like allow wildcards to happen, but generally speaking, my days I always. if I had to live the same day every day of my life and love who I became and what I had when I was 80, what would that single day look like? And I think that's a great place for people to start. You know our Habit Hero Program helps people with this. There are things that you have to change up, you know. again, that's why some of these big companies fail. They get into routines and they're stuck in them and they neglect things. But I think that's a really good way to look at it. And just the other thing is just time. Time is so important.

Speaker 1:

I want to finish with what is my favorite poem on productivity. I think, and it goes, time is the inexplicable raw material of everything. With it, all is possible, without it, nothing. The supply of time is truly a daily miracle and a fair, genuinely astonishing when one examines it. Wake up in the morning and low your purse is magically filled with 24 hours of the unmanufactured tissue of the universe of your life. It is your. It is the most precious of possession. No one can take it from you. It is unstealable And no one receives either more or less than you receive. In the realm of time, there is no aristocracy of wealth and no aristocracy of intellect. Genius is never rewarded by even an extra hour a day And there is no punishment. Waste your infinitely precious commodity as much as you will, and the supply will never be withheld from you. Moreover, you cannot draw on the future. It is impossible to get into debt. You can only waste the passing moment. You cannot waste tomorrow. It is kept for you. You cannot waste the next hour. It is kept for you.

Speaker 1:

I have said the affair was a miracle, is it not? You have to live on this 24 hours of daily time. Out of it you have to spend health, pleasure, money, content, respect and the evolution of your immortal soul. Its right use, its most effective use, is a matter of the highest urgency and of the most thrilling actuality. All depends on that. Your happiness, the elusive prize that you are all clutching for my friends, depends on that. If one cannot arrange that an income of 24 hours a day shall exactly cover all proper items of expenditure, one does muddle one's whole life indefinitely. We shall never have any more time. We have, and we have always had all the time there is by Arnold Bennett on how to live on 24 hours a day, and I just think that if people manage to schedule their day in 10 minute, 30 minute block, you'd be infinitely more productive. If you were on social media and you're like am I using this or is it using me? YouTube, netflix, right? I think that those are some good places for people to focus and think about.

Speaker 2:

Thanks. Thank you for giving us over an hour of your time with us And you know the universe can aspire for us to be here at this moment in time And I know for me it's going to be quite like an inflection point. There's things that you've said today, there are answers to gaps in what I needed, and I know that this is probably the same for Coray, and this is the gift that you brought And I just want to thank you Really grateful.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, guys. We all need each other, although I just be talking to myself in a room.

Speaker 2:

Exactly, it's been an excellent pleasure. Thank you, darrell.

Six Star Business Podcast With Darryl
Eight Critical Success Factors for Business
Business Success With Self-Efficacy
Books to Businesses
Unlocking Business Potential
Creating Impact and Building Community
Pursuing Excellence and Overcoming Barriers
Productivity and Self-Reflection Tips
Maximizing 24 Hours a Day